Let me fill this awkward silence...

Music, Baseball, and other randomings // josiahkosier.com

roomonfiredesign:

Kazuo Shinohara (April 2, 1925 – July 15, 2006) was a highly influential Japanese architect who formed what is now widely known as the “Shinohara School”, which has been linked to the works of Toyo Ito, Kazunari Sakamoto and Itsuko Hasegawa. As architectural critic Thomas Daniell put it, “A key figure who explicitly rejected Western influences yet appears on almost every branch of the family tree of contemporary Japanese architecture… is Kazuo Shinohara… His effects on the discipline as a theorist, designer and teacher have been immense.”

markrichardson:

When I was a boy I’d hear “Take the ‘A’ Train” and dream about taking the “A” train; now I live in New York and I can actually do it. This is Charles Mingus’ mid-60s band doing the Billy Strayhorn tune, which was the signature of Duke Ellington’s band. Eric Dolphy plays with Mingus here. He takes the bass clarinet solo. What a pairing. Something amazing about watching these people standing so close to each other and making this incredible music with their bodies. Eric Dolphy died a few months after this was shot. He was 36. Shortly after, Mingus released a live album featuring this band, and it had only two tracks. One was called “So Long Eric” and the other was called “Praying With Eric”.

Always such beauty in jazz.

(via markrichardson)

My piece of @astercafe here in Los Angeles. Finally.

My piece of @astercafe here in Los Angeles. Finally.

mitchellgoldstein:

Nine different pressings of Thelonious Monk’s Live In Japan, 1963

James Fauntleroy

—Children Of The Love

fauntleroy:

Children of the Love - James Fauntleroy | String Theory Acoustic

Dopeness

#VW #LA (at Hermosa Beach, California)

#VW #LA (at Hermosa Beach, California)

taaylorhoff:

There’s no better place than California. 

A woman in these is a woman indeed. 

A woman in these is a woman indeed. 

LAL vs LAC (at STAPLES Center)

LAL vs LAC (at STAPLES Center)

everlane:

Designed by Shin-ichiro Akasaka, the Small Box house features an open layout outfitted almost completely with plywood. Tickets to Japan, please.